Entertainment

Erasing David

by Phil Hall
EDGE Media Network Contributor
Friday Jul 1, 2011
Erasing David

British filmmaker David Bond puts himself on the lam in this documentary study of surveillance techniques employed by governments and corporations. Bond hires a private investigative firm to hunt him down by using readily available data. While Bond tramps about Belgium, Germany and rural Britain, the detectives engage in old-fashioned sleuthing (including dumpster diving to locate Bond's discarded telephone bills) and various spins around the Internet to locate their quarry.

For the most part, Bond is not the most effective fugitive. He allows a video interview to be posted while he is supposed to be hiding, which provides the detectives with their first big break. He also makes common fugitive mistakes by returning to familiar stomping grounds (in his case, his father's home in Canterbury).

Throughout the odyssey, Bond offers interviews with security and civil rights experts on the omnipresent state of surveillance. Most of the information will not come as a surprise - after all, governments have been keeping tabs on their populations for as long as civilization has operated under governments.

Bond tries to enliven the proceedings by insisting that he is frantic and paranoid about being discovered.

Bond tries to enliven the proceedings by insisting that he is frantic and paranoid about being discovered. He even offers a parody of the Heather Donohue videotaped goodbye from "The Blair Witch Project."

However, the genuine fun in "Erasing David" involves the low-keyed partnership between stoic detectives Duncan Mee and Cameron Gowlett, who manage to find their quarry without losing a drop of sweat. Watching the duo calmly doing their job is, strangely, more entertaining than Bond's histrionics and anti-privacy bashing.

Erasing David
$24.98
FilmBuff
DVD

Phil Hall is the author of "The Greatest Bad Movies of All Time


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