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Americans Ditch Their Clothes Minutes After Walking in the Door

Friday Apr 14, 2017

Can't wait to ditch that bra or kick off those shoes?

Americans take less than nine minutes to start shedding clothes after they get home from a hard day's work, according to a new study.

From instantly shedding clothes to answering the door in various states of undress -- we may look or act the part while at work but new results show the many ways we let loose once home.

It takes Americans an average of eight minutes and 46 seconds to start shedding less than comfortable work clothes like ties and collared shirts upon arriving home, according to results.

The comfort habits of 2,000 people across the country were captured in a study conducted by Yelp Eat24 which found that, after 16 minutes and 55 seconds, Americans are already fully changed into their pajamas or something similarly more comfortable.

Both men and women agree that it feels the best to kick off your shoes at the end of a hard day (67 percent) -- though for women this is very closely followed by removing your bra (60 percent).

As for what they slip on after, Americans' favorite comfort clothes are sweatpants by a large margin (51 percent), followed by a comfy blanket (42 percent) and slippers (38 percent).

The average time of the day that people begin fantasizing about going home to relax and get into comfy clothes is 2 p.m.

While the most popular time for people to feel wearing pajamas is 'acceptable' is from 7 p.m. onward.

However, this isn't a terribly regular luxury for the average American, as they report only having 12 nights per month when they can truly relax and enjoy the comforts of home.

Despite this, there also seems to be a number of people who may be a little bit too comfortable in their lounging-around-the-house clothes, as one in six men (16 percent) say they are totally happy to answer the door without pants on to anyone -- though only seven percent of women say they feel the same.

For others, it mostly depends on the person. Forty-seven percent have gone pant-less or in pajamas when answering the door to friends, while one in three have done the same for their parents.

And spare a thought for our delivery drivers -- more than a quarter (27 percent) of Americans have opened the door for a food delivery person while having been only partially clothed.

"We've always told our customers we support their No Pants Lifestyle," says Yelp Eat24 CEO Mike Ghaffary. "That's because, in our experience, enchiladas taste 75 percent better when you're comfortable. And there's nothing more comfortable than a drawstring waistband...or no waistband at all."

However, several respondents even admitted to answering the door in little to nothing on purpose, with one woman revealing that she accepted a dare from her boyfriend to open the door in only her underwear.

"The pizza guy dropped the pizza!" she said. "We got two free pizzas after delivery that night."

Another respondent recalled: "An elderly neighbor came to deliver fudge for Christmas as I was singing and dancing in my underwear to Bohemian Rhapsody."

And once we have our hearts set on a comfy night in we'll go to lengths to see it through -- the average American has cancelled three invitations, events or meet-ups over the last three months simply in favor of a night staying at home.

Social events with work colleagues are the most popular type of occasion for bailing on completely and text is the preferred method of breaking the news.

Being 'too tired' is the most common lie we'll tell to be able to stay in, followed by pretending we're ill or that we have work to do.

In fact, 40 percent of people admit that they can be flaky when it comes to following through on plans at least some of the time.

Women were more likely to admit to a bit of flakiness, while six percent have even used the old cliché 'I'm washing my hair tonight' to get out of something.

MOST COMMON EXCUSES USED TO STAY IN
1. I'm too tired
2. I'm sick/ not well enough
3. I have work to do
4. I don't have enough money
5. Ignore message(s) then say you 'saw it late'

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